Goodbye old Arctic sea ice! Watch here the ice evolution video from 1987 to 2014!

According to the January 2015 report by NOAA Climate.gov “Old ice in Arctic vanishingly rare”: …Decades ago, the majority of the Arctic’s winter ice pack was made up of thick, perennial ice. Today, very old ice is extremely rare…

The below first video animation tracks the relative amount of ice of different ages from 1987 through early November 2014: … the oldest ice is in white (more than 9 years old) – the youngest ice means “first-year ice,” which formed in the most recent winter is in dark blue – open water is indicated in drak gray . As the animation shows, Arctic sea ice doesn’t hold still, it moves continually. East of Greenland, the Fram Strait (see right end of picture + video) is an exit ramp for ice out of the Arctic Ocean. The melting of old ice as it passes through the warm waters of the Beaufort Sea (see left end side of picture + video – North of Alaska)… 

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The above video animation was done by NOAA Climate.gov team, based on research data provided by Mark Tschudi, CCAR, University of Colorado. Sea ice age is estimated by tracking of ice parcels using satellite imagery and drifting ocean buoys…

Further info under https://www.climate.gov/ or under https://www.facebook.com/NOAAClimateGov 

On September 17, 2014, as it is shown on the below video, the Arctic sea ice reached its minimum extent for 2014. At 1.94 million square miles (5.02 million square kilometers), it’s the sixth lowest extent of the satellite record (see here picture of the Arctic sea ice extent >>).  

Let’s remember that the sea ice acts as a vital air conditioner for the planet, reflecting energy from the sun. But with warmer temperatures and thinner, less resilient ice, the Arctic sea ice is on a downward trend… 

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